March 3rd, 2016

sammy

(no subject)

How much do you recycle?

Not at all
3(3.2%)
Only when convenient
9(9.6%)
I separate my trash
53(56.4%)
I only buy stuff that can be recycled
0(0.0%)
I recycle other people's stuff
1(1.1%)
I lecture people on recycling
0(0.0%)
I take stuff home from work to recycle it
10(10.6%)
I started a recycling program for my city
0(0.0%)
I am the recycling poster child
1(1.1%)
I call the police on my non recycling neighbor
1(1.1%)
Ticky
2(2.1%)
YOU CANNOT RECYCLE ENOUGH
11(11.7%)
GREENPEACE GAVE ME A MEDAL
2(2.1%)
Other in comments
1(1.1%)
wedding, happiest day

Interacting with public figures/celebrities

Last Saturday, my husband and I went to watch the Washington Capitals practice. This sparked all kinds of questions, but the biggest thing we were dithering over was:

What is an appropriate way to interact with the players after practice?

The Caps website specifically says that attending a practice is the best way to get a jersey or similar item signed by one of the guys, and there was a crowd of people waiting for them to leave the locker room after practice ended. We were wearing our jerseys, but we opted not to stay because we didn't want to burden them when we're sure they just want to go relax or get their stuff together for traveling later in the day.

To some degree, I think it's fine to wait and ask for a signature or pictures. As public figures, that's part of why they can command the salaries they do - part of that pay is for them to put up with people like us. On the other hand, they've just worked hard, they're tired, and they might not FEEL like putting up with us - and since I like them, I don't want to be a pain in the ass.

So, is it appropriate to wait around after a show, practice, or other event to get a celebrity to sign your stuff or take a picture with you? Is it appropriate to approach them in public, if you just happen to run into them? Have you ever done either of those things and if so, how do you think the people felt about it?
angel

large print books, divided

My mom is having trouble with normal-sized type now that she's older, and she prefers large-print books for that reason. However, some books are already so long that the large-print versions are cumbersome and uncomfortable for her to hold and carry (she also has RA); for example, she'd like to read Wolf Hall but the large-print edition is 821 pages. She is not interested in getting an e-reader.

I googled around but my search mainly returned high school geometry problems. Is there a source for large-print books divided into two or more volumes, or is there a method for dividing an existing book?