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[Dec. 8th, 2013|01:11 pm]
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[sodamnhorrible]

Do you consider it rude/inconsiderate/whatever to order food for delivery during inclement weather? It's just begun to snow here and while a coworker was talking about ordering pizza, another was aghast at the thought, saying it was dangerous for the delivery people. There's maybe 2 inches on the ground. Roads are not awesome but there's lot of cars out there.

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Comments:
[User Picture]From: oh_honestly_
2013-12-08 06:16 pm (UTC)

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Nah. I'd just give them an extra large tip.
[User Picture]From: nynaeve_sedai
2013-12-08 10:38 pm (UTC)

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This! :)
[User Picture]From: noveldevice
2013-12-09 08:13 pm (UTC)

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Yeah. If it's that bad out the restaurants will be closed or not offering delivery.
[User Picture]From: velum_cado
2013-12-08 06:17 pm (UTC)

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If it's that bad, they stop doing deliveries, in my experience. Just ring up and ask, and if they are delivering, make sure you give the driver a good tip.
[User Picture]From: ahzheejhei
2013-12-08 06:17 pm (UTC)

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I don't find it rude... I usually double my tip during the winter season because where I'm from the winter can be horrendous. Is it heavy snowfall?
[User Picture]From: lisasimpsonfan
2013-12-08 06:18 pm (UTC)

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If the weather is so bad that things are shutting down then yes it's inconsiderate to ask someone to risk their life for a pizza but a little rough weather is part of their job. I do tip more in bad weather.
[User Picture]From: lied_ohne_worte
2013-12-08 06:19 pm (UTC)

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If it's weather in which I myself could safely drive to work-related appointments myself, no. I would expect a delivery service to stop providing deliveries if they judged the weather dangerous for their employees.
[User Picture]From: katydidnt98
2013-12-08 06:35 pm (UTC)

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No, but one should tip more than usual and be tolerant of weather-related delays.
[User Picture]From: oneworldvision
2013-12-08 06:40 pm (UTC)

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It depends on how bad the weather is. If it's not so bad you wouldn't go out in it yourself if you had to, then I think it's fine to order delivery (but I'd definitely tip extra!). If it's bad enough that you wouldn't feel safe driving in it, asking someone else to go out is an asshole move.
[User Picture]From: oxygen__
2013-12-08 06:43 pm (UTC)

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Nope, but as others have said, I tip better in less than ideal weather.
[User Picture]From: tabular_rasa
2013-12-08 06:46 pm (UTC)

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No, for stuff like rain and snowfall I think it's one of the hazards of the job. But I would tip well, and plan for delays and not hold them against the delivery person.

If there's were a genuine weather emergency like a tornado or flash flood warning, I would expect the business to either explain they can't process my order until the warning clears or just not even pick up in the first place.
[User Picture]From: hikerpoet
2013-12-08 06:49 pm (UTC)

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As someone who worked at a place who did deliveries (but it was more like quick catered business brunches and both our customers and staff were a different demographic--i.e pizza does tend to have a lot of teens having to use their own cars whereas this was a bit more of a professional place with company transportation) I agree with the others it depends.

If it is not so bad, which is what it sounds like from what you're saying, go ahead and order it with no/little guilt. If anything, business can tend to drop off precipitously and you can have trouble making goals. But again, I suspect it may be different with pizza so don't feel guilty for NOT doing so, either.

But sometimes it would start to get REALLY bad. Like blizzard or ice storm level. We'd be thinking about closing but would need district management/corporate approval. Sometimes calls would come in while we were sorting this out and we were like, "Really? What are people dreaming of when it is this extreme?". On a side note, this was in a city with a subway, so getting home from work was not a safety issue--but we sometimes used cars for delivery given the quantity of what we had to delivery. Obviously, this was a company/business problem too, that we had to jump through so many hoops to shut down and had a weird in between period where it was REALLY sketchy but we were expected to do normal business til we heard, but we did kind of wonder what was going through people's heads during those rare really bad ones.

[User Picture]From: smashionista
2013-12-09 08:41 am (UTC)

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When I read the comments here saying the business would close down if it was THAT bad, I was thinking, "Hopefully, but...does that actually happen?"

I rarely expect any businesses to put their employees' safety before money and customers, sorry to say.
[User Picture]From: ghost_light
2013-12-08 06:59 pm (UTC)

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It crosses my mind that it would be a dick move to order food when the roads are icy.
[User Picture]From: kinkakinka
2013-12-08 07:02 pm (UTC)

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if it's a REALLY bad storm, then I think it's a little mean. If it's just snowing a bit, meh. If it's a medium storm, just tip well and they'll appreciate it.
[User Picture]From: anywhereanyone
2013-12-08 07:04 pm (UTC)

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It's up to the business to stop taking deliveries if they don't want to take them.
[User Picture]From: shiori_hime
2013-12-08 07:16 pm (UTC)

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If people stopped ordering food for delivery during inclement weather where I live, nobody would ever get delivery during the winter where. That doesn't happen, though. People still order out (and go to their jobs, send their kids to school, etc.) because dealing with the winter weather is part of living here. I think it's one thing to call for delivery during weather you yourself would never drive in. That doesn't strike me as unreasonable at all. During a situation that is clearly dangerous, like a blizzard with white-out conditions or an oncoming hurricane, it would be a lot more unreasonable to call for delivery and it's not something I would do.
[User Picture]From: alkahestapeiron
2013-12-08 07:20 pm (UTC)

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I actually asked this on my facebook yesterday - for the last couple of days it had been really, really cold (-45C with windchill) and I wanted a pizza rather badly. Everyone who commented agreed that it was fine, they have toasty warm cars, just leave a big tip.

I think I'd draw the line in really heavy snowfall or dangerous driving conditions in general.
[User Picture]From: heyfashion
2013-12-08 07:39 pm (UTC)

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I've never really thought about it, but I could see why somebody would think that's a little inconsiderate. I mean, if the weather is really SUPER bad, I would hope they would stop deliveries until the weather got better. In general though, if it's bad weather (but not horrible) I just give them a bigger tip.
[User Picture]From: janet_snakehole
2013-12-08 07:40 pm (UTC)

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As a delivery driver who was just stuck in a ditch for hours during an awful snow storm with 20 orders an hour on our screen and two drivers all night: you're definitely not being considerate. And we hate you.

(If you wouldn't drive to go get food because you don't feel safe, you're a jerk for making someone else risk their life because you don't feel like heating up leftovers of whatever. Like, if you have NO FOOD and NO OTHER OPTIONS then fine, yeah, you need to eat to live. I doubt that was the case with everyone on our order screen that night.)
[User Picture]From: wobblerlorri
2013-12-08 10:37 pm (UTC)

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That sounds like more of a staffing issue than inconsiderate customers.... who would only schedule two drivers for a delivery store?
[User Picture]From: hikerpoet
2013-12-09 12:16 am (UTC)

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It's sometimes easier said than done. Normally at that location two may be more than enough. But when all of a sudden a storm moves in, and it takes five times longer to drive anywhere, things get bungled up, and you'd literally need to quintuple your staff while trying to gauge if that is a reasonable scale up. Sure, you can watch the forecast and try to add more people on the schedule, but it is a dick move to force people with very little notice, although I am surprised by how reluctant people are to pick up hours despite complaining about a shitty economy and being broke.

I don't think people ordering with an inch or two of fluffy snow on the ground are assholes. As I said, in the past, we've sometimes wished more people would! But if it is REALLY sketchy out, I think it is somewhat iffy. Yeah, it should be up to a business to just shut down when it is that bad, but as I said above it can be easier said than done with the red tape-y shit.
[User Picture]From: hikerpoet
2013-12-09 12:19 am (UTC)

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Oh, but reading your comment below, that is really good those two companies ground their drivers when it is really extreme. Sadly some other companies require a lot more hoop jumping.
[User Picture]From: janet_snakehole
2013-12-09 04:29 am (UTC)

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Pretty much what hikerpoet said, 2 drivers is standard and usually totally sufficient for a Tuesday night, but the storm kept getting worse and worse instead of letting up and we didn't have anyone on call to have come in. They really should ground our drivers in weather like that, but they won't because money. It really just looks bad on our company though, because as I said I was in a ditch for a few hours and went home straight after so if you ordered a pizza that night, chances are you got a call back saying it couldn't be delivered and we need to give you a voucher instead. Basically the same as grounding your drivers, except you're teasing people with the anticipation of a pizza for at least an hour before you call them and have to say "It's not happening tonight, sorry"

Not to mention the fact that as a driver I'm having panic attacks every five minutes during my shift because I'm narrowly avoiding accidents. I had my windows cracked when I was smoking cigarettes and even though I couldn't see around me, I kept hearing accidents happening everywhere, crash after crash. It was like a war-zone.
[User Picture]From: ships_sail
2013-12-09 04:23 pm (UTC)

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Maybe you shouldn't take on jobs you're not equipped to do
[User Picture]From: janet_snakehole
2013-12-09 06:00 pm (UTC)

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Totally! I'm calling and quitting rn, A+ advice
[User Picture]From: phenomenal
2013-12-08 07:50 pm (UTC)

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If it's too dangerous to drive, it is up to the business to stop deliveries. You are not being inconsiderate to ask a business if they are currently providing a service.
[User Picture]From: reliklaerek
2013-12-08 08:18 pm (UTC)

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With the inclement weather that you're describing, no.
HOWEVER, don't get upset if they're delayed by the weather, and strongly consider giving a larger tip than usual.

A good rule of thumb is if you wouldn't be comfortable driving on the roads in the current weather, then you probably shouldn't order food for delivery.
[User Picture]From: verygwen
2013-12-08 08:18 pm (UTC)

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If the weather is crapy enough that I wouldn't want to drive, I think I'd be a shitty person to make someone else drive in it.
[User Picture]From: failstoexist
2013-12-08 09:31 pm (UTC)

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I think it's always OK to ask...it should be up to the business to determine what's safe for the drivers...and the drivers themselves. They can refuse to go out if it's terribly unsafe, and I'm sure most of them do not value their job more than their life. However, being delivery drivers, they are used to driving in conditions that are a bit worse than what the general public probably deals with, because they get called out when people would rather stay home. I assume they're more skilled at snowy driving than I am, since I work in public schools and have snow days if it's bad out...when I used to work in a residential program I was a great driver in the snow, because we had to work regardless.

I also would expect slower delivery times and expect to tip more in bad weather.
[User Picture]From: isunova
2013-12-08 09:35 pm (UTC)

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Everyone is saying the business will shut down if they don't think it's safe for their drivers, but I just don't think that's true. I have not worked as a delivery driver but I have worked in retail as a manager at a craft store and the hoops we had to go through to get the store shut down were absolutely ridiculous. The best example I can give is the 2011 Jan 31-Feb 2 blizzard. A state of emergency was declared, National Guard deployed, A Civil Danger Warning usually reserved for terrorist attacks or water contamination emergencies was issued to keep people off the roads. Parts of our major freeways were closed, government buildings and schools were closed.

We still opened.

Obviously that is an extreme example, but the point is, your Pizza Huts and Papa Johns don't have reasonable people who are seeing the weather making the decision as to whether or not it's safe for their drivers. They have someone in an office who is looking purely at numbers and caring only about profit calling the shots. Your average person ordering is not even going to have a thought occur to them about the safety of a delivery driver, they are just going to think that they want food delivered and order it and as long as that keeps happening, they are going to keep delivering. Keep in mind that most delivery drivers are inexperienced, teenage drivers.

If you would feel totally comfortable driving (in any kind of car), then go ahead and order. Otherwise, don't. Is it really worth it?
[User Picture]From: beckyc
2013-12-08 09:54 pm (UTC)

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No. If the weather is too dangerous, they'd not take the orders.
[User Picture]From: wobblerlorri
2013-12-08 10:34 pm (UTC)

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Hell no. That's their job, and when they signed on I'm sure they realized it was going to involve driving at night and in bad weather. Now if the roads are really horrible, Domino's and Papa John's will ground their delivery drivers -- I've worked for them both and we did. Usually over the protests of the drivers!!

What I do, if it's really bad weather, I'll tip bigger. But I don't not call -- you're just hurting the entire business that way.
[User Picture]From: kmeghan
2013-12-08 10:36 pm (UTC)

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A blizzard would be bad. 2 inches of snow isn't much. I just tip more in bad weather.
[User Picture]From: ilysespieces
2013-12-09 02:13 am (UTC)

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no, i just tip extra. i mean, we wouldn't order delivery when sandy hit, but 2 inches of snow is nothing, i'd assume they'd know how to handle themselves in snow well enough.
[User Picture]From: bad_lcuk
2013-12-09 02:17 am (UTC)

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No, i think thats often the time a lot of people do it. Do you mean rude to the driver, who works the job that they do? Not at all, its their job, but that doesnt mean i dont feel bad and probably give them a larger tip lol
Its not like if you dont order a pizza in bad weather ,someone else wont.
[User Picture]From: manderleys
2013-12-09 03:59 am (UTC)

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nah, but i would give an extra large tip and patience if it's a little late!