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grammar? how do I do it? [Jan. 30th, 2013|11:55 am]
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hi TQC!
I've designed my own wedding invitation suite and am taking them to print as soon as I can. however, I'm having a little grammar trouble and want to quadruple check before I print. so, stupid question... it IS "Laura's and Maxwell's wedding," not "Laura and Maxwell's wedding," right? the more I think about it the more my IQ is dropping.

what's the last absolutely incredible meal you had?
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: lightofdaye
2013-01-30 04:56 pm (UTC)

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You know I don't know either

So I'd go with;- 'The wedding of laura and maxwell'
[User Picture]From: badgerly
2013-01-30 04:58 pm (UTC)

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Exactly what I was going to say!
[User Picture]From: sblmnldrknss
2013-01-30 05:01 pm (UTC)

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Laura and Maxwell's
[User Picture]From: chaostrophy
2013-01-30 05:13 pm (UTC)

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This
[User Picture]From: teefers
2013-01-30 06:29 pm (UTC)

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this
[User Picture]From: 69love_songs
2013-01-30 06:38 pm (UTC)

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sounds about right
[User Picture]From: due27south
2013-01-30 11:07 pm (UTC)

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mte
[User Picture]From: coconut_theory
2013-01-30 05:06 pm (UTC)

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Laura and Maxwell's

An amazing steak dinner at a fancy schmancy restaurant at the end of last year. I had a 6 oz. filet, creamed spinach, and a twice baked potato. I wish I could eat there every day.
[User Picture]From: noodledays
2013-01-30 05:14 pm (UTC)

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if you give us the context, we can probably help you better, but generally I agree it sounds better to say something like, "You're invited to attend the wedding of Laura and Maxwell..."
[User Picture]From: chaostrophy
2013-01-30 05:15 pm (UTC)

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Last night my SO made shark filets, potato wedges and some steak (he made it in case the shark wasn't good but it was delicious) and steamed broccoli. For an appetizer with cocktails we had braised eel.
[User Picture]From: saya_cintamu
2013-01-30 09:24 pm (UTC)

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a+ to your SO - that all sounds amazing
[User Picture]From: chaostrophy
2013-01-30 10:56 pm (UTC)

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It was so good. I am so freaking glad that he likes to cook and is good at it.
[User Picture]From: saintwithasw0rd
2013-01-30 05:37 pm (UTC)

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I disagree with the others. It is Laura's and Maxwell's.

Break it up: whose wedding is it?

Laura's wedding.
Maxwell's wedding.

What the others are saying is this: "Maxwell's wedding" and "Laura," which are two separate things.


Last good one was probably a Pakistani meal.
[User Picture]From: tbone
2013-01-30 05:47 pm (UTC)

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I agree with this. "Laura's and Maxwell's" sounds wrong to a lot of people, but it's actually the right way to go.
[User Picture]From: noodledays
2013-01-30 06:15 pm (UTC)

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nah, multiple sources say otherwise. ;o
[User Picture]From: tbone
2013-01-30 07:36 pm (UTC)

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Well, I'll be dipped. You're right. I guess I learned something new today.
[User Picture]From: noodledays
2013-01-30 06:14 pm (UTC)

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the separate possessives can also make it sound like two different possessions (or events in this case).

the rule is an apostrophe and s after the last noun or name where there is joint ownership. but it can sound awkward which is why I like to flip it around and use "of" where I can.
[User Picture]From: plasmic_slime
2013-01-30 07:21 pm (UTC)

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Can I pull my UK top 5 university education in English and say it's Laura and Maxwell's?
[User Picture]From: socraticomatic
2013-01-31 12:13 am (UTC)

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lol I studied Arts in one of my country's top 5 universities, including some English units, and most of those kids would have no idea, and many of them had really average grammar. So, nope.
[User Picture]From: heyfashion
2013-01-30 07:31 pm (UTC)

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Laura and Maxwell's

although since you are still getting mixed responses, i'd probably be safe and go with "the wedding of Laura and Maxwell"
[User Picture]From: geiselle
2013-01-30 09:00 pm (UTC)

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"Laura and Maxwell's wedding." It's a joint possessive; you're basically referring to them as one unit, so you can rephrase it as "The wedding of Laura and Mark." "Laura's and Mark's wedding" uses two singular possessives and would instead be rephrased as "The wedding of Laura and the wedding of Mark." In context, I'm sure people would get either one, but take it out of context and it gets confusing.
[User Picture]From: bellapalmera
2013-01-31 02:07 am (UTC)

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I wonder how Maxwell feels about being ditched for this Mark guy.
[User Picture]From: geiselle
2013-01-31 05:42 am (UTC)

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Haha, well, I did always favor Mark. You want to marry MAXWELL, Laura? Well, that is maximum awful...mark my words.
[User Picture]From: sociale
2013-01-31 03:17 pm (UTC)

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hahaha
[User Picture]From: cpb1220
2013-01-30 09:37 pm (UTC)

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Laura and Maxwell's because you're a unit.

But I'd do "The wedding of Laura and Maxwell" instead.
[User Picture]From: shevmak
2013-01-31 02:25 am (UTC)

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Huh, I really don't know either :) Gah, I'm no help!

A roast dinner last night with all the trimmings, winning!
[User Picture]From: jaelle_n_gilla
2013-01-31 02:16 pm (UTC)

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Not a native speaker but as far as I remember "Laura and Maxwell's" would suggest you're a team and it's the wedding of the two of you. "Laura's and Maxwell's" can be used in, like, "Laura's and Maxwell's car is both a Mercedes" meaning they have the same kind of car but one each. Or in your case the same kind of wedding.

Why not ask the printer. They should know.