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[Jan. 24th, 2013|02:26 pm]
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[lutine]
Imagine you're the manager in charge of hiring/firing at your company. You hire an employee and they do an excellent job. Several years later, you discover that they lied on their application to get the job. Assuming the lie is something that doesn't affect their ability to do their current job, would you fire them?

Some examples:
1. They lied about being previously fired from another job for attendance-related issues. (They haven't had any attendance issues with your company.)
2. They lied about being convicted of a DUI. (Their job does not involve driving at all.)
3. They made up a degree. (The degree has no bearing on their current occupation.)
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: dangomango
2013-01-24 10:30 pm (UTC)

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Nope, nope, and ESPECIALLY nope re: #3.

People are allowed to turn over a new leaf!

[User Picture]From: st0neface
2013-01-24 10:31 pm (UTC)

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After "several years" I think I'd for the most part go with their record with our company, but I'm not going to say their future advancement might be a little more rigorously looked at .
[User Picture]From: just_3_euros
2013-01-24 10:38 pm (UTC)

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Aren't applications legally binding and you have to sign stating all the info included is true?

On the flip side...

Also, all this information they lied about would be easily accessed, since it's all public record//able to call previous employers no?


Seems like both eomployer and employee weren't doing what they should have.

[User Picture]From: bellapalmera
2013-01-24 11:17 pm (UTC)

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This. Apparently this company doesn't run background checks. (This wouldn't have cancelled out the first example, but probably the second one and definitely the third one.)
[User Picture]From: lutine
2013-01-24 11:18 pm (UTC)

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I joked to my husband that he should invent a degree for his resumé because he's from a different country and I doubted that they could/would run a background check on him from America.
[User Picture]From: bigeyedphish
2013-01-25 01:25 am (UTC)

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My job called my school in the UK to make sure it was real. So. Good luck with that.
[User Picture]From: lutine
2013-01-25 01:27 am (UTC)

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I was kidding, like I said, but none of my jobs have even bothered checking my employment references, oddly enough.
[User Picture]From: angelas_apron
2013-01-24 11:46 pm (UTC)

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I think it varies from state to state but I've worked at places where legally previous employers can only confirm the dates the employee worked for them and whether or not they were eligible for rehire.
[User Picture]From: just_3_euros
2013-01-24 11:46 pm (UTC)

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This makes sense.
[User Picture]From: idemandjustice
2013-01-24 11:50 pm (UTC)

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Yeah, I think that's the case around here. So it would be very hard to prove someone had been fired from a previous job.
[User Picture]From: zanegief
2013-01-25 01:40 am (UTC)

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As someone in the HR field I'll let you know that this isn't true in any state. As long as what they say is factual they can say it. Typically some companies will only release general information about the employee which can include termination or info on why they left but this is just to protect themselves from liable.
[User Picture]From: idemandjustice
2013-01-24 11:49 pm (UTC)

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A lot of employers don't look at that stuff. I've heard people on the radio admit to inventing degrees, and getting hired based on them, and the employer never verified it. I know I've had them verify it for me, because one previous employer had trouble verifying where I'd attended high school, because for some reason they were searching under my married name, even though I'd supplied my maiden name.
[User Picture]From: sblmnldrknss
2013-01-24 10:44 pm (UTC)

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Is this totally at my discretion? Companies usually have policies on this stuff, so I would follow the company's policy.

If it was up to my discretion, probably not.
[User Picture]From: manderleys
2013-01-24 10:47 pm (UTC)

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No to all of those examples, although I don't know the legality behind it or what my company's handbook would be... but assuming it was just up to my discretion, then no
[User Picture]From: chaostrophy
2013-01-24 10:48 pm (UTC)

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How did I come to find this information out?
Are they simply performing at the expected level in their current position or are they exceeding expectations?
I may not fire them, but it would probably have an effect on my decisions to promote them for a while. I expect my employees to be honest, and I'd have a hard time getting past this unless they were the one to "confess" it to me and a discussion including the reasons why followed.
[User Picture]From: cpb1220
2013-01-24 11:04 pm (UTC)

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I'd definitely question them about it, but I don't think I'd fire them. The job they're doing now is more important. But they'd need to give me a pretty good reason for having made up a degree. idgaf about the others.
[User Picture]From: heyfashion
2013-01-24 11:07 pm (UTC)

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I'd confront them about it but i'm not sure I would fire them. If they are a good employee and they aren't hurting the business in any way, that's all that really matters.

That said, I think a lot of people secretly lie on resumes. You just don't hear about it because they never get caught.
[User Picture]From: ghoulia
2013-01-24 11:09 pm (UTC)

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are there jobs that specifically ask, "have you been convicted of a dui?"
[User Picture]From: lutine
2013-01-24 11:11 pm (UTC)

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Usually they ask if you've been convicted of any crimes.
[User Picture]From: lai_lai_ranma
2013-01-25 03:58 am (UTC)

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They can only ask if you've been convicted of any felonies now.
[User Picture]From: wildflower399
2013-01-25 05:05 am (UTC)

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I would think a cab company might ask that? At the least it would be relevant to the job.
[User Picture]From: strivingtoohard
2013-01-24 11:24 pm (UTC)

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I would fire them. Then I would give them the privilege of re-applying.
[User Picture]From: noodledays
2013-01-24 11:53 pm (UTC)

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you would fire them for all three?
[User Picture]From: phenomenal
2013-01-24 11:26 pm (UTC)

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I would confront them about it and depending on the company may or may not fire them, though I would be leaning towards the side of firing.
[User Picture]From: thunderflyer
2013-01-24 11:26 pm (UTC)

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If they've been my employee in good standing for several years, why do a give one whole fuck what's on their application?
[User Picture]From: boplenty
2013-01-24 11:51 pm (UTC)

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+1
[User Picture]From: angelas_apron
2013-01-24 11:44 pm (UTC)

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Yes, it brings up some serious integrity issues.
[User Picture]From: semi_sweet
2013-01-25 04:53 am (UTC)

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this
[User Picture]From: idemandjustice
2013-01-24 11:47 pm (UTC)

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If it's been years and they're performing well, I probably wouldn't do anything about it.
[User Picture]From: due27south
2013-01-25 12:06 am (UTC)

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Fired!
[User Picture]From: kmeghan
2013-01-25 12:17 am (UTC)

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#2 would be an issue, but the other two I don't really care about
[User Picture]From: oh_honestly_
2013-01-25 12:53 am (UTC)

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I would not fire someone over that. Now, if they had been doing a bad job, I might use it as an excuse. But since they're a very good employee, they definitely would get a pass.
[User Picture]From: shevmak
2013-01-25 01:10 am (UTC)

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I wouldn't fire them, but I would have a note put on their file or what not, and a discussion would have to be had. Overall if someone is doing a good job I wouldn't really care.
[User Picture]From: zanegief
2013-01-25 01:33 am (UTC)

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I actually do the hiring/firing for my company so this kind of stuff does happen occasionally. It really depends on the nature of the work they're doing and how bad the lie was.

1. Wouldn't fire but this would make promotions take a bit longer.

2. Assuming I hadn't already run a background check this would make one happen. If everything else looks good I'd keep them but they'd be watched very closely by the company.

3. This would get them fired because of company policy and require that we inform anyone looking into their work history about it.
[User Picture]From: vivid_corners
2013-01-25 03:03 am (UTC)

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No to all three.
[User Picture]From: zombiefruit
2013-01-25 08:46 am (UTC)

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Probably not, unless the previous conviction were somehow relevant (e.g. they could not have a previous conviction) but in that case I would have done a CRB check, I guess.
[User Picture]From: fuhni
2013-01-25 01:58 pm (UTC)

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I think the third option would be the most problematic.
At least here, because your wage depends a lot on your academic background.

I wouldn't mind the first two cases so much, especially if they proved to be a reliable employee.
I'd like to think that I wouldn't fire them in any case, but in reality they have been 'stealing' from my company by faking a degree because I paid them more than they 'deserved' (I'd like to think that people deserve their paycheck for the work they're doing, but I also see why people with higher education get paid more, since it took them more time and energy and also money to finish their degree. Lying about that is kinda not cool.)
[User Picture]From: ilysespieces
2013-01-26 01:08 am (UTC)

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nope, i would not give a shit at that point.