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[Nov. 29th, 2012|06:14 pm]
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[jess_mill]
What do you call a 19th century clergyman? A priest, a pastor, or a minister? For example at our church we call the preacher Pastor Daniels, so what would a 19th century clergyman be called?
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: salamandertoast
2012-11-30 02:24 am (UTC)

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I think it depends on the denomination? Pastor was a term used for some clergymen at the time, I think, but it probably depends on the church.
[User Picture]From: jess_mill
2012-11-30 03:08 am (UTC)

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hmm that's interesting...I think I might do more research on it.
[User Picture]From: mlledesade
2012-11-30 02:28 am (UTC)

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As salamandertoast pointed out, it depends on the denomination.
[User Picture]From: slloyd
2012-11-30 02:29 am (UTC)

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Vicar? Father?

The local clergyman from the local church when I was in junior school was known as "Father *insert name*"

Edited at 2012-11-30 02:30 am (UTC)
[User Picture]From: jess_mill
2012-11-30 03:09 am (UTC)

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Thanks for responding :)
[User Picture]From: firerosearien
2012-11-30 03:01 am (UTC)

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Depends on the denomination.

[User Picture]From: dawgdays
2012-11-30 03:03 am (UTC)

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It depends on the denomination. If you're writing a story, and you're setting your cleric as part of a particular denomination, let us know which one.

"Minister" seems to be the most generic term of reference. "Reverend [name]" or "the Reverend [name]" seem to be the most generic terms of address. In other words, "Reverend Jones is a minister." "Pastor" is also a frequently-used term of both reference and address.

I know that in the Roman Catholic and Episcopal Churches, "priest" is the term of reference, and the usual term of address is "Father [name]."

(Since the Episcopal Church has women priests, it is sometimes "Mother [name]", though I have seen some women priests use "Pastor". [My wife is an Episcopal priest.])
[User Picture]From: jess_mill
2012-11-30 03:10 am (UTC)

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uh Christianity is a denomination right?
[User Picture]From: lutine
2012-11-30 03:27 am (UTC)

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.... No.
[User Picture]From: jess_mill
2012-11-30 04:47 am (UTC)

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What is denomination than?
[User Picture]From: sblmnldrknss
2012-11-30 04:05 am (UTC)

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"Non Denominational Christian" is a denomination, but it's a recent thing.
[User Picture]From: dawgdays
2012-11-30 05:31 am (UTC)

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Uh, no. Christianity is a religion, and there are multiple Christian denominations.
- Roman Catholic
- Eastern Orthodox
- Protestant, including denominations such as:
-- Lutheran
-- Episcopal
-- Methodist
-- Baptist
And scores of others.

Then there are the non-denominational churches.

More information here.
[User Picture]From: jess_mill
2012-12-01 04:54 am (UTC)

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Thanks for explaining it to me :) and I think I'm gonna call the character Reverend.
But for further understanding I will def. look at the site linked.
[User Picture]From: sarahonlife
2012-11-30 03:38 am (UTC)

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Reverend is considered wrong in some denominations though, because "only God is to be revered" (Yes, I got a customer letter once on the subject, lol).
[User Picture]From: jess_mill
2012-11-30 04:48 am (UTC)

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Thanks for responding
[User Picture]From: dawgdays
2012-11-30 05:32 am (UTC)

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Yeah, like I said, it depends on the denomination, and I'm not familiar with the usage in all that many of them, so I'm not surprised to be caught by this.